House Majority Whip Steve Scalise Was Reportedly an Honored Guest at 2002 International White Supremacist Convention

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“By 2002, everybody knew that Duke was still the man he claimed not to be. EVERYBODY,” Erickson said in a blog on his website RedState.com. “How the hell does somebody show up at a David Duke organized event in 2002 and claim ignorance?”

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Top Republican doesn’t deny speech to white supremacist group

Washington (CNN) — Rep. Steve Scalise, the No. 3-ranking House Republican, isn’t denying a Louisiana blog’s allegation that he spoke at a white supremacist forum in 2002.

According to an agenda for the event and notes attendees posted afterward, Scalise appeared at the National/International EURO Workshop on Civil Rights — a forum hosted by a white nationalist organization founded by David Duke, a former grand wizard of the Ku Klux Klan.

CenLamar

According to recently uncovered posts on Stormfront, the Internet’s oldest and most notorious white nationalist and neo-Nazi forum, the United States House Majority Whip, Steve Scalise (R- Louisiana), was allegedly an honored guest and speaker at an international conference of white supremacist leaders.

His district may have ignored it at the time, but the American public can’t.

Twelve years ago last May, the spacious but plainly appointed conference rooms of the Landmark Best Western Hotel in Metairie, Louisiana, a 16-story, drably-colored octagon-shaped tower that juts into an empty skyline and hugs Interstate 10 so tightly that it serves, in a way, as a type of gateway monument into the city of New Orleans, were filled with dozens of people from all over the country. They had each spent between $35 and $45 for the opportunity to participate in a two-day conference on “civil rights.” Many of them had likely decided to…

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